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March 07, 2006

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Cameron Reilly

Bryan, thanks for the review of the show! I understand your criticism and frustration. We have skipped quite quickly over the Revolution and will continue to do so, purely because we are trying to stick to Napoleon's role. And although it's better to think of Napoleon in context with the Revolution as a background (isn't all history that way?), we decided to make this show a "quick" intro to the subject.

Re the frustration... I often find myself listening to podcasts in my car wanting to say something to the hosts of the a show! Not unlike talkback radio when you can't through on their phone line. And yet here we are! Talking! I heard your criticisms, albeit in a timeshifted sense.

Finally, I appreciate your thoughts on using podcasting for education. That's part of my ambition for TPN's education division - to find people willing to produce shows that can be packaged up in discreet sets that provide a solid introduction to a wide range of subjects, from history to science, from the arts to politics.

Hope you keep enjoying the show!

cheers
Cameron Reilly

David

Bryan,

Thank you for your nice comments on our show. I'm glad you like it and find it useful. Of course, we cannot cover everything in the depth that we might prefer, and that includes the French Revolution. That watershed event will be seen primarily in terms of how it influenced Napoleon and his career. Obviously it did far more than that, but no matter what we added it would not do it justice. Perhaps we, or someone, will do a show dedicated to the Revolution.

One area that I will certainly stress (and think I may have mentioned) is that it is the wars of the French Revolution that sets France against Europe (really the other way around), not the mythical belief that the "Napoleonic Wars" were the result of Napoleon's egotistic war mongering.

Keep on listening and please let me know if there is anything that you would especially like to see us discuss.

J. David Markham

PS The link to my information is to a very out of date site. I suggest you link to what Cameron has on his site, which is 4 years more current. Thanks!

Christian

I think this is why the medium works so well. I listened to the first two Napoleon podcasts and really got into it. For me though, what I think puts credability & value is other people's feedback (ie you Bryan)

If I was in school / uni etc. I would be hearing one persons view. This way, I get to hear and read Cameron, David and Bryan's! Gold!

Jim Parker

Bryan,

Great food for thought here. I'm in the process of filling out the iTunes University application and this helps me clarify my thinking.

-jim

Matt Pasiewicz

I definately share the frustrations you mentioned, but I'm not sure what the solution is. I most often listen to podcasts on a PocketPC phone, so if I'm really motivated to jot down some thoughts or record some comments, I can do that, but still, I find that most of the time I'm in the car and I'm writing some notes down in pen on my wrist that I'll either add to a wiki, a blog comment or just loose in the shower ;)

Seriously tho' ... I suspect that a mix of transcripts, better integrated browsers/players/annotation tools (the flock of mp3 players?), ubiquitous internet, better voice recogntion technology and some magical doi/persistent identifier solution might remedy some of these problems in the future. It is going to take a while tho ...

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