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September 26, 2007

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pete naegele

I wouldn't call this the "early years" by any means! It's more like the "mid-life crisis".

A good place to start is John Oswald's "Plunderphonics, or Audio Piracy as a Compositional Prerogative" from 1985. Actually, his entire site is a decent history of plunderphonia and Oswald's interactions and influences on it.

From Oswald, one should look to Negativland's ">http://www.negativland.com/fairuse.html"> "Fair Use" essay and their take on ">http://www.negativland.com/intprop.html"> IP issues in general. Their influence can be heard on such releases as "Escape From Noise", "U2" [if you can find it], and "Helter Stupid", however their seminal release on the issue is "FAIR USE: THE STORY OF THE LETTER U AND THE NUMERAL 2" from 1995.

The best analysis of "The U2 Incident" [as I came to know it] is "Sonic Outlaws" from 1995, which is still available for purchase! Even the cover is a fantastic bit of jam art.

Bryan Alexander

Or we could go back to early 20th century collage. Yes, it's not "early" in a general sense. I inferred that it meant early in the Web age.

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